Brenda Platt

Brenda Platt

Brenda Platt

Workshop Instructor | Institute for Local Self-Reliance

Washington, DC | bplatt@ilsr.org

Brenda Platt is the Director of the Institute for Local Self Reliance (ILSR) Composting for Community Initiative. Brenda has conducted a variety of technical projects during her 33-year affiliation with ILSR. She has evaluated the best recycling and composting programs in the US, written numerous reports, and provided technical assistance to community groups, government, and industry. She has a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from The George Washington University, Washington, DC. Brenda has been certified as a MD compost facility operator twice. This expertise, along with her extensive work in recycling, zero waste planning, and local economic development, complements Brenda’s current work promoting composting as a key climate mitigation and job creation strategy. She is a member of the U.S. Composting Council and an active member of its Legislative Committee. In addition to conceiving of and launching the Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders Composter Training Program, Brenda has led the development of six national Cultivating Community Composting Forums, spurred a national Cultivating Community Composting coalition and movement. In 2017, the US Composting Council awarded her its H. Clark Gregory Award for outstanding service to the composting industry through grassroots efforts. In 2019, BioCycle magazine featured Brenda as one of its organics recycling trailblazers.

Workshop Time: Tuesday, January 28, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Workshop Title: Community Food Scrap Composting—Path To Success

Workshop Description: This in-depth and interactive training for community food scrap composters is designed for small-scale operators and local government interested in supporting their efforts. The technical aspects of community composting to be covered include: 1) Siting and planning small scale operations—locations include community gardens, schools, businesses, churches, food pantries, farms, recreational areas, housing developments; 2) “System Support”—compost team/staff recruitment, retention, duties, and training; communication (team, site, signage); identifying community or neighborhood resources, strengths, opportunities, and challenges; building community support and good neighbor practices; and fundraising; 3) Community Scale Compost Systems—from windrows to tumblers to worm bins; 4) Sizing operations to stay within state regulations and how this translates into site and system needs, capacity, volunteer/staff duties; 5) Sourcing the right materials; and 6) Ensuring success: BMPs – from site inspection to process management. Community composting specifics for urban and rural/small town will be integrated into the discussion.